© webdesign - chaddesley-corbett
Made with Xara Chaddesley Corbett Worcestershire, U.K.
Welcome to this historic village set in the beautiful countryside of north Worcestershire

Early Background

The village of Chaddesley Corbett is an ancient settlement with a prehistoric buriel mound and traces of a Roman road. Originally known as Chaddesley the name is thought to mean "Ceadda's clearing in the wood" and is first mentioned in a Saxon Charter of 816 when the land was given to the Bishop of Worcester in return for hospitality to the King of Mercia and his men. It is mentioned in the Domesday Book as belonging to a Saxon Noblewoman - and had two priests,  several corn mills, a population as large as Kidderminster and two saltpans in Droitwich for it's own use. After the Norman Conquest the Manor of Chaddesley was owned by the Corbett family who added their name to it’s title.  Later, church lands passed to the Earldom of Warwick and, eventually, to the Throckmortons of Coughton Court.

Contemporary History

Chaddesley woods in Chaddesley Corbett became a Nature Reserve in 1973 through the generosity of Mr. John Cadbury. The reserve consists of 53 hectares of native oak woodland and 47 hectares of recent plantations of  young hardwoods and softwoods - which were added to show how wild life conservation can be intergrated with modern commercial management. A "Jubilee Walk" was introduced in 1977 to mark the 25th anniversary of the Queen's accession to the throne.  The walk is marked by yellow arrows - which indicate public rights of way - and by white arrows which indicate courtesy paths.   There are Voluntary Wardens for the woods and the area is managed by the Nature Conservancy Council. The Woods are a special feature of the area and attract many visitors all through the year. Car parking only by the roadside. Guard against thefts.

Life in Chaddesley Corbett 100 years ago

January 1917

January 6th: Among   the   military   honours   is   the   award   of   the Military   Cross    to   Captain   Pratt .      We   heartily   congratulate   him,   but we   wish   we   had   known   it   when   he   was   here   in   December,   as   we might have celebrated it in a fitting manner. The   list   of   those   "specially   mentioned"   by   Sir   Douglas   Haigh   this week,   includes   the   name   of   the   Hon-Major   and   Quartermaster Dan   Sallis .   There   are   still   some   of   us   who   remember   Dan   when   he lived   at   Cakebole.   He   was   a   very   fine   specimen   of   manhood   when   I first   remember   him.   He   served   with   distinction   in   the   South   African War, and is adding rapidly to his laurels in the present conflagration. A    wounded    British    officer,    paying    a    chance    visit    to    Chaddesley, rested   in   a   Bromsgrove   hostelry   while   awaiting   a   'bus'.   He   was   in plain   clothes,   and   is   not   noted   for   advertising   his   misfortunes.   His fine    proportions    drew    the    attention    of    the    assembled    company, several   of   whom   commenced   to   mercilessly   assail   him   for   not   being in   the   army.   He   resisted   the   temptation   to   "spoil   somebody's   face", and   was   enjoying   immensely   the   fury   of   his   oppressors   when   all   the fun   was   upset   by   a   wounded   soldier   in   khaki   walking   in.   The   latter was    from    his    own    Battalion,    and    after    expressing    his    kindly sympathies   with   the   junior   the   gallant   officer   withdrew.   The   wife   of his    chief    tormentor    had    sat    silent    till    that    moment,    then    she unburdened   herself   with   the   opinion   that   her   "mon"   always   had   been, and always would be, a sanguinary person devoid of understanding. January 13th Another   link   with   the   olden   days   was   served when   Miss   Elizabeth   Blakeway   passed   away,   at   Beauty   Bank,   on Tuesday.   Born   in   the   days   when   George   IV.   was   king   the   deceased lady   had   seen   the   multitude   of   changes   with   the   progress   of   the maiden    through    the    reigns    of    five    Sovereigns.    Owing    to    her advanced   age   she   has   been   an   invalid   for   some   years   but   has   been tenderly   nursed   by   her   sister   and   other   relatives   to   the   end   brought her peace. Miss    Agnes    Meredith     reports    the    receipt    of    one    hundred    and seventeen   eggs   during   September   for   wounded   soldiers.   Her   grand total   for   the   past   year   is   seven   thousand   six   hundred   and   three   eggs with   the   addition   of   nearly   £5   in   cash   -   a   truly   magnificent   record, reflecting   every   credit   on   Miss   Meredith   and   her   splendid   staff   of volunteer   lady   workers.   We   doff   our   caps   to   each   and   every   one   of them and wish them even greater success in the future. Our   soldier   visitors   this   week   include   Ernest   Grazier   and   Sydney Haughty .   Ernest   looks   remarkably   well   considering   the   buffeting   he has   received   from   the   Huns   -   they   no   doubt   received   his   share   of   the returned   compliments   -   and   he   is   cheerily   looking   forward   to   dose the   foe   once   more.   The   French   air   must   suit   Sydney,   for   he   seems   to have   grown   half   as   big   again,   and   is   as   bright   as   a   new   pin.   -   Those among   us   who   remember   Harry Wood ,   now   a   Sergeant   Major ,   will be   delighted   to   hear   that   he   has   been   awarded   the   D.S.M.    No   doubt his    experience    through    the    South   African    war    has    been    of    great advantage   to   him   during   the   present   struggle.   Good   luck   to   him   and more power to his elbow. On    Wednesday     afternoon     a     party     of     wounded     soldiers     from Hartlebury   hospital   were   entertained   at   Sion   Barn,   kindly   lent   for   the occasion    by    Mrs    Watts .    The    outing    was    organised    by    Miss Meredith     who    was    ably    assisted    by    the    M isses    Page,    Misses Meredith,   Mrs   Cooper,   Miss   Hill   and   others.   The   chief   item   was the   whist   drive   -   only   soldiers   allowed   on   the   prize   list.   A   most enjoyable afternoon was spent. January 20th   After   four   long   months   of   waiting   and wondering,     news     has     come     through     once     more     from      John Dickinson ,   prisoner   in   Turkey.   He   is   quite   well   and   is   probably working   on   the   Angora   Erzurum   Railway,   but   the   sensor   has   played with   his   letter   and   expunged   the   portion   which   might   have   explained his long silence and other items of interest. Sergeant   W.   Green 's   letter   shows   that   he   is   among   the   sport   on   the Struma   front.   Describing   a   village   he   has   visited,   he   states   there   were enough   wild   dogs   to   eat   his   regiment   -   Turks   and   Greeks   wandering, fancy   free,   to   the   great   discussed   of   "Tommy",   there   is   a   distinct inclination   by   the   innkeepers   to   snub   the   British.   Evidently   Tino   is up   to   his   tricks   there. Among   the   curiosities   he   observed   were   -   a   pig in   a   cage,   and   sheep   used   for   drawing   loads.   His   Christmas   dinner was    interrupted    by    a    visit    from    the    Bulgars    -    fortunately    to    the detriment of the Bulgars. It   is   with   sincere   regret   we   have   to   record   the   death   of   Mr.   W. Satterthwaite,    which   occurred   with   painful   suddenness   on   Sunday, at   his   residence   at   Handsworth.   He   seemed   quite   in   his   usual   health up   to   2.30   in   the   afternoon.   After   completing   his   business   duties   he sat   down   in   his   chair,   complained   he   felt   unwell,   and   expired   in   a few   moments.   He   will   be   remembered   among   Chaddesley   folk   as   a genial   landlord   at   the   Fox   Hotel.   Mrs.   Satterthwaite   paid   the   old village   a   visit   just   being   Christmas,   and   we   little   thought   then   such   a terrible      blow   was   in   store   for   her.   Our   sincere   sympathies   are   with her and the family. January 27th:   The    news    from    our    soldier    boys    this week   unfortunately   includes   two   casualties;   George   Scriven    is   in hospital   with   "trench   foot",   and   Jack   Hughes   is   in   hospital   with wounds in the head. Full particulars are not available yet. Dr.   Dennis   Fitch    has   thus   far   received   acknowledgement   of   seventy Christmas   parcels   and   had   only   one   returned   parcel   -   singularly   this was   Gunner   Fain 's   particular   bundle.   He   has   been   moving   about considerably   lately   so   probably   that   accounts   for   the   parcel   missing him.   Will   Raybould,   Will   Dickinson    and   Fred   Millward   have   had one   merry   meeting   in   Egypt.   They   had   a   few   pleasant   hours   together -   clinked   glasses   -   (wicked)   and   relived   old   memories.   This   reminds me   of   a   lady   friend   who   could   not   allow   her   son   to   enlist   as   he   had been    carefully    reared    "good",    and    soldiers    "said    such    naughty words".    Compulsory    service,    however    became    the    rule    and    his "goodness"    blossomed    forth.    He's    still    free,    he's    a    conscience objector.   I   prefer   orthodox   naughty   folk   -   they   generally   are   honest and sincere. During   the   week   some   of   us   gained   an   interesting   insight   into   the doings   of   some   of   our   country-men   who   are   interned   in   Germany. The    prisoners    at    Ruhleben    prepared    and    published    a    Christmas magazine   and   one   of   them   managed   to   transmit   a   copy   to   a   friend   of his   and   mine   in   England.   It   is   a   book   of   sixty   four   pages,   copiously illustrated   with   a   front   page   similar   to   Punch. The   whole   work   shows considerable   artistic   merit   and   the   fund   of   humour   throughout   speaks volumes for British pluck which can endure such privation. The   cottages   at   Lower   Chaddesley   had   an   exciting   ten   minutes   on Saturday    afternoon.   After    a    capital    run    the   Albrighton   Woodland hounds   secured   their   prey   in   Mr.   Richards '   garden.   They   played havoc   with   the   turnip   bed,   but   ample   compensation   was   made   and   all ended   happily   -   no,   not   quite,   there   was   much   bemoaning   that   an adjoining fox could not be opened for devourment.
© webdesign @ chaddesley corbett
Chaddesley Corbett Worcestershire U.K.
Welcome to this historic village set in the beautiful countryside of north Worcestershire

Early Background

The village of Chaddesley Corbett is an ancient settlement with a prehistoric buriel mound and traces of a Roman road. Originally known as Chaddesley the name is thought to mean "Ceadda's clearing in the wood" and is first mentioned in a Saxon Charter of 816 when the land was given to the Bishop of Worcester in return for hospitality to the King of Mercia and his men. It is mentioned in the Domesday Book as belonging to a Saxon Noblewoman - and had two priests,  several corn mills, a population as large as Kidderminster and two saltpans in Droitwich for it's own use. After the Norman Conquest the Manor of Chaddesley was owned by the Corbett family who added their name to it’s title.  Later, church lands passed to the Earldom of Warwick and, eventually, to the Throckmortons of Coughton Court.

Contemporary History

Chaddesley woods in Chaddesley Corbett became a Nature Reserve in 1973 through the generosity of Mr. John Cadbury. The reserve consists of 53 hectares of native oak woodland and 47 hectares of recent plantations of  young hardwoods and softwoods - which were added to show how wild life conservation can be intergrated with modern commercial management. A "Jubilee Walk" was introduced in 1977 to mark the 25th anniversary of the Queen's accession to the throne.  The walk is marked by yellow arrows - which indicate public rights of way - and by white arrows which indicate courtesy paths.   There are Voluntary Wardens for the woods and the area is managed by the Nature Conservancy Council. The Woods are a special feature of the area and attract many visitors all through the year. Car parking only by the roadside. Guard against thefts.

Life in Chaddesley Corbett 100 years ago

January 1917

Among   the   military   honours   is   the   award   of   the   Military   Cross    to   Captain   Pratt .      We heartily   congratulate   him,   but   we   wish   we   had   known   it   when   he   was   here   in   December,   as   we might have celebrated it in a fitting manner. The   list   of   those   "specially   mentioned"   by   Sir   Douglas   Haigh   this   week,   includes   the name   of   the   Hon-Major   and   Quartermaster   Dan   Sallis .   There   are   still   some   of   us   who remember   Dan   when   he   lived   at   Cakebole.   He   was   a   very   fine   specimen   of   manhood   when   I first   remember   him.   He   served   with   distinction   in   the   South   African   War,   and   is   adding   rapidly to his laurels in the present conflagration. Our   soldier   visitors   this   week   include   Ernest   Grazier   and   Sydney   Haughty .   Ernest looks   remarkably   well   considering   the   buffeting   he   has   received   from   the   Huns   -   they   no   doubt received   his   share   of   the   returned   compliments   -   and   he   is   cheerily   looking   forward   to   dose   the foe   once   more. The   French   air   must   suit   Sydney,   for   he   seems   to   have   grown   half   as   big   again, and   is   as   bright   as   a   new   pin.   - Those   among   us   who   remember   Harry   Wood ,   now   a   Sergeant Major ,   will   be   delighted   to   hear   that   he   has   been   awarded   the   D.S.M.    No   doubt   his   experience through   the   South African   war   has   been   of   great   advantage   to   him   during   the   present   struggle. Good luck to him and more power to his elbow. Sergeant   W.   Green 's   letter   shows   that   he   is   among   the   sport   on   the   Struma   front. Describing   a   village   he   has   visited,   he   states   there   were   enough   wild   dogs   to   eat   his   regiment   - Turks   and   Greeks   wandering,   fancy   free,   to   the   great   discussed   of   "Tommy",   there   is   a   distinct inclination   by   the   innkeepers   to   snub   the   British.   Evidently   Tino   is   up   to   his   tricks   there. Among the   curiosities   he   observed   were   -   a   pig   in   a   cage,   and   sheep   used   for   drawing   loads.   His Christmas   dinner   was   interrupted   by   a   visit   from   the   Bulgars   -   fortunately   to   the   detriment   of the Bulgars. The    news    from    our    soldier    boys    this    week    unfortunately    includes    two    casualties; George   Scriven    is   in   hospital   with   "trench   foot",   and   Jack   Hughes   is   in   hospital   with   wounds in the head. Full particulars are not available yet.