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Made with Xara Chaddesley Corbett Worcestershire, U.K.
Welcome to this historic village set in the beautiful countryside of north Worcestershire

Early Background

The   village   of   Chaddesley   Corbett   is   an   ancient settlement   with   a   prehistoric   buriel   mound   and traces of a Roman road. Originally    known    as    Chaddesley    the    name    is thought   to   mean   "Ceadda's   clearing   in   the   wood" and   is   first   mentioned   in   a   Saxon   Charter   of   816 when    the    land    was    given    to    the    Bishop    of Worcester   in   return   for   hospitality   to   the   King   of Mercia and his men. It     is     mentioned     in     the     Domesday     Book     as belonging   to   a   Saxon   Noblewoman   -   and   had   two priests,      several   corn   mills,   a   population   as   large as   Kidderminster   and   two   saltpans   in   Droitwich for it's own use. After     the     Norman     Conquest     the     Manor     of Chaddesley   was   owned   by   the   Corbett   family   who added their name to it’s title.  Later,    church    lands    passed    to    the    Earldom    of Warwick   and,   eventually,   to   the   Throckmortons   of Coughton Court.

Contemporary History

Chaddesley   woods   in   Chaddesley   Corbett   became a   Nature   Reserve   in   1973   through   the   generosity of Mr. John Cadbury. The   reserve   consists   of   53   hectares   of   native   oak woodland   and   47   hectares   of   recent   plantations of      young   hardwoods   and   softwoods   -   which   were added   to   show   how   wild   life   conservation   can   be intergrated          with          modern          commercial management. A   "Jubilee   Walk"   was   introduced   in   1977   to   mark the   25th   anniversary   of   the   Queen's   accession   to the throne.  The    walk    is    marked    by    yellow    arrows    -    which indicate   public   rights   of   way   -   and   by   white   arrows which indicate courtesy paths.   There   are   Voluntary   Wardens   for   the   woods   and the   area   is   managed   by   the   Nature   Conservancy Council.   The   Woods   are   a   special   feature   of   the area    and    attract    many    visitors    all    through    the year. Car parking only by the roadside. Guard against thefts.

Life in Chaddesley Corbett 100 years ago

July 1916

- One would think that the war would upset all such things as fairs: yet on Saturday the steady stream of people through Chaddesley en route for Bromsgrove showed that the fair was as popular as ever. All sorts and conditions of men, women and vehicles, kept clattering by.   ‘’Those, the rich, they rode in chaises;   while they, the poor, they walked like the blazes.’’ The one fly in the ointment was the vagaries of the buses. The ‘bus officers tried their utmost to please everybody and with the usual result. It was too unkind to cut off the usual return ‘bus from Kidderminster at night. Several folk were left hopelessly stranded. -A soldier boy (at Salonika) writing for some insect powder, states: ‘’We suffer from a perfect plague of PERIZZITES’’ -Fred Millward has quite recovered from his wounds, and has rejoined his regiment. - July 8th Last Sunday morning brought us the good news that John Dickinson is alive and well. There is no doubt that a few of his friends have secretly mourned him as dead since that dreadful episode at Katia on Easter Sunday. From a place in Turkey with an unpronounceable name, John writes home thusly: “Just a few lines to let you know I am alright even if I am a prisoner. It is a sad end to our regiment, as we did not do so badly before. Well it is no use crying over spilt milk and I suppose we must make the best of it. We are being treated as well as can be expected. We get three meals a day; breakfast, (barley) dinner (stew), chiefly lentils, and supper (which was beans last night). We get a good supply of wholemeal bread, so we always have that to fall back on. I expect you will have heard before that I am a prisoner. I don’t know what has become of Millward, but I am very much afraid he has gone under. Norrie Butler is alright as he was left behind at Bala, sick, and Eric White is alright. If you send a parcel out here at all be sure and send things which will keep, such as fish paste, and something to help the bread down. It is no use sending anything that has to be cooked, because we can’t get any hot water. Be sure and send a copying pencil as pencils are very scarce here. I expect we shall be able to write one letter a week. I think those not killed were very lucky. Of our troop of 26 there are eleven left, five wounded of those. I haven’t a scratch. Mr Pearson was killed. He was quite near to me when he was hit. Tell all my friends that I am alright and hope to be back home before Christmas. Send me a housewife and see that there is some good thread in it as by what I can see I shall want it.” - National Egg Collection for the Wounded Soldiers - The wounded in the great battle are arriving nightly in London. Remember hundreds will owe their lives probably to the nourishing fresh egg. - Miss Agnes Meredith reports for the month of June 856 eggs. “This is good, but not nearly enough. Please do not refrain because you keep no fowls-the weekly penny is as good as the weekly egg-and the weekly twopence, more so.” - July 15th The news has been received this week that Lieutenant Green (Royal Welsh) has died of his wounds in hospital. He was well known and very popular at Chaddesley. He married a sister of Mrs Blakeway (The Fold Farm), and a few years ago emigrated to America. Although he was the essence of fun and frolic, his true character appears in his action when war broke out. He immediately through up a good appointment out West and travelled 4,000 miles to offer himself in the service of his native land.
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Chaddesley Corbett Worcestershire U.K.
Welcome to this “historic” village set in the beautiful countryside of north Worcestershire

‘The Boys on the Board'

“Chaddesley Corbett -  The Impact of World War One on a Worcestershire Parish” On behalf of the History Society, Sylvia Beardshaw has written this new book. Over 200 men with a Chaddesley connection who fought in WW1 have been identified. The book is about them and the impact of this war on life in Chaddesley Corbett. It contains 60 pages and is illustrated with many photographs both old and new, newspaper cuttings, map and tables. In Chaddesley it is for sale in the Village Butcher, the Flower Room and the Post Office, or contact_ Rob Blakeway 01562 777679 robandjoyblakeway@gmail.com  or Sylvia Beardshaw 01562 777955 rhbsb@ukgateway.net  Price £5.  A donation will be made to The Royal British Legion for each copy sold.

Early Background

The   village   of   Chaddesley   Corbett   is   an   ancient   settlement   with   a prehistoric buriel mound and traces of a Roman road. Originally    known    as    Chaddesley    the    name    is    thought    to    mean "Ceadda's   clearing   in   the   wood"   and   is   first   mentioned   in   a   Saxon Charter   of   816   when   the   land   was   given   to   the   Bishop   of   Worcester in return for hospitality to the King of Mercia and his men. It   is   mentioned   in   the   Domesday   Book   as   belonging   to   a   Saxon Noblewoman    -    and    had    two    priests,        several    corn    mills,    a population   as   large   as   Kidderminster   and   two   saltpans   in   Droitwich for it's own use. After   the   Norman   Conquest   the   Manor   of   Chaddesley   was   owned by the Corbett family who added their name to it’s title.  Later,    church    lands    passed    to    the    Earldom    of    Warwick    and, eventually, to the Throckmortons of Coughton Court.

Contemporary History

Chaddesley     woods     in     Chaddesley     Corbett     became     a     Nature Reserve in 1973 through the generosity of Mr. John Cadbury. The   reserve   consists   of   53   hectares   of   native   oak   woodland   and   47 hectares   of   recent   plantations   of      young   hardwoods   and   softwoods -   which   were   added   to   show   how   wild   life   conservation   can   be intergrated with modern commercial management. A    "Jubilee    Walk"    was    introduced    in    1977    to    mark    the    25th anniversary of the Queen's accession to the throne.  The   walk   is   marked   by   yellow   arrows   -   which   indicate   public   rights of way - and by white arrows which indicate courtesy paths.   There    are    Voluntary    Wardens    for    the    woods    and    the    area    is managed   by   the   Nature   Conservancy   Council.   The   Woods   are   a special   feature   of   the   area   and   attract   many   visitors   all   through   the year. Car parking only by the roadside. Guard against thefts.