© webdesign - chaddesley-corbett
Made with Xara Chaddesley Corbett Worcestershire, U.K.
Welcome to this historic village set in the beautiful countryside of north Worcestershire

Early Background

The village of Chaddesley Corbett is an ancient settlement with a prehistoric buriel mound and traces of a Roman road. Originally known as Chaddesley the name is thought to mean "Ceadda's clearing in the wood" and is first mentioned in a Saxon Charter of 816 when the land was given to the Bishop of Worcester in return for hospitality to the King of Mercia and his men. It is mentioned in the Domesday Book as belonging to a Saxon Noblewoman - and had two priests,  several corn mills, a population as large as Kidderminster and two saltpans in Droitwich for it's own use. After the Norman Conquest the Manor of Chaddesley was owned by the Corbett family who added their name to it’s title.  Later, church lands passed to the Earldom of Warwick and, eventually, to the Throckmortons of Coughton Court.

Contemporary History

Chaddesley woods in Chaddesley Corbett became a Nature Reserve in 1973 through the generosity of Mr. John Cadbury. The reserve consists of 53 hectares of native oak woodland and 47 hectares of recent plantations of  young hardwoods and softwoods - which were added to show how wild life conservation can be intergrated with modern commercial management. A "Jubilee Walk" was introduced in 1977 to mark the 25th anniversary of the Queen's accession to the throne.  The walk is marked by yellow arrows - which indicate public rights of way - and by white arrows which indicate courtesy paths.   There are Voluntary Wardens for the woods and the area is managed by the Nature Conservancy Council. The Woods are a special feature of the area and attract many visitors all through the year. Car parking only by the roadside. Guard against thefts.

Life in Chaddesley Corbett 100 years ago

August 1916

September 2nd Congratulations to young Geoffrey Tandy - one time a pupil at Harvington school. He has, since residing in Kidderminster, made rapid educational strides, and although he is very youthful yet, has secured an excellent appointment as junior master in Salisbury Collegiate (Cathedral) School. He has been a scholar at Kidderminster Grammar school for several years past, and no doubt will carry with him the good wishes of all the friends he made there. I wish some clever artist could paint a real expressive picture of the ‘’night bus’’ at Chaddesley on a Sunday night. What a strange contrast in the many faces, not only in the bus but in the surrounding crowd: joy and jollity closely interwoven with pathos and anguish. There is the girl enjoying her jolly day out- the daughter saying goodbye to mother- the soldier returning from a short leave and bravely smiling at the relatives around whose thoughts could fill a book, and whose facial twitches betray the mental agony they are enduring; and silent and worn-looking sit the munition workers, off back to their heavy unceasing toil after a few hours respite. Few seem to realise yet that these men also are suffering, and suffering often in silence. Many of them are making money fast, but money does not compensate for all the things that happen in life, and many of our munition workers in years to come will have to suffer in silence, caused by the hardships they now have to endure. Their own clear consciences may be sufficient reward for them. September 9th The children re-assembled in force at both the schools in the parish on Monday, and there were no holiday tragedies to record. The assembling at Hillpool School was the more interesting as the mistress had celebrated her holiday by entering the wedded state. We all congratulate her but cannot avoid addressing her as ‘’Miss’ at present. During the week we received a visit from a smart young Canadian soldier, who proved to be Mr Wm Probert, second son of Mrs Probert, Hill Pool. He emigrated to Canada seven years ago, and had established a flouring grocery business- when the call of his country proved irresistible and he has come to do his bit. September 23rd During the past week we had surprise visits from Wilfred and Geoffrey Perrins - the former fresh from ‘’somewhere in France’ - and the latter with some very interesting reminiscences of the Cuffley Zeppelin, he having been one of the selected guards who took charge of the ruins. The other ‘’boys’’ home on leave included Fred Jones and Will Cartwright, the latter having journeyed specially to view his new son and heir. Good luck to both of them. On Wednesday afternoon Mr John Penny, while working a machine saw at Messrs. Seagers. Ltd, had the misfortune to get his hand against it. He was taken to Kidderminster Infirmary and detained as an in-patient. I regret to hear that his one thumb is practically gone. September 30th The church officials are making an earnest attempt to solve the lighting trouble. All unnecessary windows have been fitted with frames covered with a dark material, and the remainder with dark wind up blinds. At present the stained glass windows are uncovered, and it remains with the powers of be to settle whether this item complies with the regulations. A Chaddesley native, who was in the vicinity of Sunday’s air- raid, says: ‘’It is anything but a picnic, but soon over. One Zeppelin seemed to travel straight up our main road and dropping bombs every eighth of a mile. I stayed out three hours, and obtained a piece of bomb as a memento’’. It’s a sorry position to have to accept soldiers as lodgers with reluctance, but when one examines the official menu and compares it with the official figure for payment, one wonders if those at the head of Affairs possess a conscience. War profits are unknown among country villagers - they know enough about expenditure from the transactions of the profiteers. War bonuses do not come our way. We love the Tommies , but we have not the where- withal to find them ‘’tommy’’ at present rates. And some of us are warned of dire pains and penalties if we refuse. It’s a sorry condition of affairs, and needs some immediate adjustment.
© webdesign @ chaddesley corbett
Chaddesley Corbett Worcestershire U.K.
Welcome to this “historic” village set in the beautiful countryside of north Worcestershire

Early Background

The village of Chaddesley Corbett is an ancient settlement with a prehistoric buriel mound and traces of a Roman road. Originally known as Chaddesley the name is thought to mean "Ceadda's clearing in the wood" and is first mentioned in a Saxon Charter of 816 when the land was given to the Bishop of Worcester in return for hospitality to the King of Mercia and his men. It is mentioned in the Domesday Book as belonging to a Saxon Noblewoman - and had two priests,  several corn mills, a population as large as Kidderminster and two saltpans in Droitwich for it's own use. After the Norman Conquest the Manor of Chaddesley was owned by the Corbett family who added their name to it’s title.  Later, church lands passed to the Earldom of Warwick and, eventually, to the Throckmortons of Coughton Court.

Contemporary History

Chaddesley woods in Chaddesley Corbett became a Nature Reserve in 1973 through the generosity of Mr. John Cadbury. The reserve consists of 53 hectares of native oak woodland and 47 hectares of recent plantations of  young hardwoods and softwoods - which were added to show how wild life conservation can be intergrated with modern commercial management. A "Jubilee Walk" was introduced in 1977 to mark the 25th anniversary of the Queen's accession to the throne.  The walk is marked by yellow arrows - which indicate public rights of way - and by white arrows which indicate courtesy paths.   There are Voluntary Wardens for the woods and the area is managed by the Nature Conservancy Council. The Woods are a special feature of the area and attract many visitors all through the year. Car parking only by the roadside. Guard against thefts.

Life in Chaddesley Corbett 100 years ago

August 1916

September 2nd Congratulations to young Geoffrey Tandy -one time a pupil at Harvington school. He has, since residing in Kidderminster, made rapid educational strides, and although he is very youthful yet, has secured an excellent appointment as junior master in Salisbury Collegiate (Cathedral) School. He has been a scholar at Kidderminster Grammar school for several years past, and no doubt will carry with him the good wishes of all the friends he made there. I wish some clever artist could paint a real expressive picture of the ‘’night bus’’ at Chaddesley on a Sunday night. What a strange contrast in the many faces, not only in the bus but in the surrounding crowd: joy and jollity closely interwoven with pathos and anguish. There is the girl enjoying her jolly day out- the daughter saying goodbye to mother- the soldier returning from a short leave and bravely smiling at the relatives around whose thoughts could fill a book, and whose facial twitches betray the mental agony they are enduring; and silent and worn-looking sit the munition workers, off back to their heavy unceasing toil after a few hours respite. Few seem to realise yet that these men also are suffering, and suffering often in silence. Many of them are making money fast, but money does not compensate for all the things that happen in life, and many of our munition workers in years to come will have to suffer in silence, caused by the hardships they now have to endure. Their own clear consciences may be sufficient reward for them. September 9th The children re-assembled in force at both the schools in the parish on Monday, and there were no holiday tragedies to record. The assembling at Hillpool School was the more interesting as the mistress had celebrated her holiday by entering the wedded state. We all congratulate her but cannot avoid addressing her as ‘’Miss’ at present. During the week we received a visit from a smart young Canadian soldier, who proved to be Mr Wm Probert, second son of Mrs Probert, Hill Pool. He emigrated to Canada seven years ago, and had established a flouring grocery business- when the call of his country proved irresistible and he has come to do his bit. September 23rd During the past week we had surprise visits from Wilfred and Geoffrey Perrins - the former fresh from ‘’somewhere in France’ - and the latter with some very interesting reminiscences of the Cuffley Zeppelin, he having been one of the selected guards who took charge of the ruins. The other ‘’boys’’ home on leave included Fred Jones and Will Cartwright, the latter having journeyed specially to view his new son and heir. Good luck to both of them. On Wednesday afternoon Mr John Penny, while working a machine saw at Messrs. Seagers. Ltd, had the misfortune to get his hand against it. Has taken to Kidderminster Infirmary and detained as an in-patient. I regret to hear that his one thumb is practically gone. September 30th The church officials are making an earnest attempt to solve the lighting trouble. All unnecessary windows have been fitted with frames covered with a dark material, and the remainder with dark wind up blinds. At present the stained glass windows are uncovered, and it remains with the powers of be to settle whether this item complies with the regulations. A Chaddesley native, who was in the vicinity of Sunday’s air-raid, says: ‘’It is anything but a picnic, but soon over. One Zeppelin seemed to travel straight up our main road and dropping bombs every eighth of a mile. I stayed out three hours, and obtained a piece of bomb as a memento’’. It’s a sorry position to have to accept soldiers as lodgers with reluctance, but when one examines the official menu and compares it with the official figure for payment, one wonders if those at the head of Affairs possess a conscience. War profits are unknown among country villagers - they know enough about expenditure from the transactions of the profiteers. War bonuses do not come our way. We love the Tommies , but we have not the where-withal to find them ‘’tommy’’ at present rates. And some of us are warned of dire pains and penalties if we refuse. It’s a sorry condition of affairs, and needs some immediate adjustment.