© webdesign - chaddesley-corbett
Made with Xara Chaddesley Corbett Worcestershire, U.K.
Welcome to this historic village set in the beautiful countryside of north Worcestershire

Early Background

The village of Chaddesley Corbett is an ancient settlement with a prehistoric buriel mound and traces of a Roman road. Originally known as Chaddesley the name is thought to mean "Ceadda's clearing in the wood" and is first mentioned in a Saxon Charter of 816 when the land was given to the Bishop of Worcester in return for hospitality to the King of Mercia and his men. It is mentioned in the Domesday Book as belonging to a Saxon Noblewoman - and had two priests,  several corn mills, a population as large as Kidderminster and two saltpans in Droitwich for it's own use. After the Norman Conquest the Manor of Chaddesley was owned by the Corbett family who added their name to it’s title.  Later, church lands passed to the Earldom of Warwick and, eventually, to the Throckmortons of Coughton Court.

Contemporary History

Chaddesley woods in Chaddesley Corbett became a Nature Reserve in 1973 through the generosity of Mr. John Cadbury. The reserve consists of 53 hectares of native oak woodland and 47 hectares of recent plantations of  young hardwoods and softwoods - which were added to show how wild life conservation can be intergrated with modern commercial management. A "Jubilee Walk" was introduced in 1977 to mark the 25th anniversary of the Queen's accession to the throne.  The walk is marked by yellow arrows - which indicate public rights of way - and by white arrows which indicate courtesy paths.   There are Voluntary Wardens for the woods and the area is managed by the Nature Conservancy Council. The Woods are a special feature of the area and attract many visitors all through the year. Car parking only by the roadside. Guard against thefts.

Life in Chaddesley Corbett 100 years ago

November 1916

November   4th   A   Marvellous   Coincidence   -   While   travelling by   rail   to   London,   Mr   W   T   Taylor   of   Blakedown,   conversed with   some   wounded   soldiers   and   discovered   Cyril   Fitch’s pal   among   them.   He   was   next   in   the   trench   to   poor   Cyril awaiting   the   signal   to   ‘’go   over’’.   Their   last   words   were   a pledge   to   each   other   that   if   one   was   taken   and   the   other left   the   survivor   would   notify   the   relatives   to   the   best   of   his ability.    The    survivor,    poor    fellow,    had    been    too    badly knocked   about   himself   to   immediately   redeem   the   pledge, but   he   did   so   the   very   next   day   after   seeing   Mr   Taylor,   and although   it   is   poor   consolation,   the   Doctor   and   Mrs   Dennis Fitch   have   all   the   details   of   the   noble   way   their   boy   met   his end. A   letter   from   Captain   Acton   Wall   speaks   in   high   terms   of the   capabilities   of   Lieut   H   G   Hill   (son   of   Boraston   Hill).   The     gallant    captain    and    Lieut    Hill    have    had    some    strenuous times   in   the   trenches   together.   We   are   all   pleased   that   the Lieutenant   is   making   good   progress   towards   recovery,   and that his wounds are not very difficult of treatment. Bill   Pain   has   sent   me   one   of   his   characteristic   letters   from France.   He   and   Bert   Pritchard   have   been   receiving   quite   as much    attention    from    the    strafing    Huns    as    they    care    to tolerate,   fortunately   without   mishap   so   far.   He   says,   if   he live   to   return,   we   shall   find   him   darting   for   cover   if   only   a bike tyre ‘’bursts’’ The   death   occurred   on   Sunday   of   Mr   Henry   Skinner   senior, of    Drayton.    The    deceased    gentleman    had    reached    an advanced    age,    and    had    retired    from    business    for    some years. Miss   Agnes   Meredith   reports   the   receipt   of   three   hundred and thirty two eggs for the wounded soldiers last month. November   11th   Miss   Phillips,   who   has   for   several   years, been    assistant    mistress    at    Hillpool    Council    School,    was married   at   Bewdley   on   Wednesday.   She   is   not   severing   her connection   with   the   school,   but   her   fellow   teachers   and scholars   could   not   let   the   happy   event   pass   without   some mark   of   appreciation   of   the   bride   and   her   good   work.   They have    therefore    presented    her    with    a    very    pretty    silver teapot,   which   we   all   hope   will   often   provide   the   cup   that cheers,   etc.,   when   her   soldier   husband   returns   from   the war. Mr   David   Mann   has   met   with   a   serious   accident.   Returning from   Flyford   Flavel   stock   sale   something   went   wrong   and the   trap   was   overturned,   and   Mr   Mann   was   considerably damaged.   He   was   taken   to   a   cottage   in   an   unconscious condition.   After   recovering   consciousness   he   was   conveyed home,    and    is    now    receiving    careful    attention    from    Dr Dennis Fitch. November   18th   Over   two   hundred   subscribers   have   given their   bit   to   Dr   Dennis   Fitch’s   fund   for   soldier’   Christmas parcels    and    the    total    amount    subscribed    is    about    £40. Anyone   who   has   neglected   to   secure   the   honour   of   being on   the   subscription   list,   may   by   favour   be   still   allowed   to make amends this week. November   25th   The   annual   supper   in   connection   with   the Drayton   Bowling   Club   was   held   at   The   Robin   Hood   Inn   on Thursday   16th   inst.   There   were   about   twenty   present,   and Mrs   Pardoe   had   prepared   a   very   nice   repast.   The   Chairman (   Mr   Page)   suggested   that   a   collection   be   made   for   the ‘Soldiers    Parcel    Fund’:    with    the    result    that    10s    6d    was raised. On   Tuesday   the   funeral   of   Mr   Drinkwater   (the   Mearce)   took place    at    Harvington    Chapel    The    deceased    had    been    an invalid     for     some     considerable     time,     and     his     death occasioned   no   surprise.   There   were   a   considerable   number of   relatives   and   friends   present   at   the   funeral   to   pay   a   last tribute of respect to one who was deservedly popular.
© webdesign @ chaddesley corbett
Chaddesley Corbett Worcestershire U.K.
Welcome to this “historic” village set in the beautiful countryside of north Worcestershire

Early Background

The village of Chaddesley Corbett is an ancient settlement with a prehistoric buriel mound and traces of a Roman road. Originally known as Chaddesley the name is thought to mean "Ceadda's clearing in the wood" and is first mentioned in a Saxon Charter of 816 when the land was given to the Bishop of Worcester in return for hospitality to the King of Mercia and his men. It is mentioned in the Domesday Book as belonging to a Saxon Noblewoman - and had two priests,  several corn mills, a population as large as Kidderminster and two saltpans in Droitwich for it's own use. After the Norman Conquest the Manor of Chaddesley was owned by the Corbett family who added their name to it’s title.  Later, church lands passed to the Earldom of Warwick and, eventually, to the Throckmortons of Coughton Court.

Contemporary History

Chaddesley woods in Chaddesley Corbett became a Nature Reserve in 1973 through the generosity of Mr. John Cadbury. The reserve consists of 53 hectares of native oak woodland and 47 hectares of recent plantations of  young hardwoods and softwoods - which were added to show how wild life conservation can be intergrated with modern commercial management. A "Jubilee Walk" was introduced in 1977 to mark the 25th anniversary of the Queen's accession to the throne.  The walk is marked by yellow arrows - which indicate public rights of way - and by white arrows which indicate courtesy paths.   There are Voluntary Wardens for the woods and the area is managed by the Nature Conservancy Council. The Woods are a special feature of the area and attract many visitors all through the year. Car parking only by the roadside. Guard against thefts.

Life in Chaddesley Corbett 100 years ago

November 1916

November    4th    A    Marvellous    Coincidence    -    While    travelling    by    rail    to London,   Mr   W   T   Taylor   of   Blakedown,   conversed   with   some   wounded soldiers   and   discovered   Cyril   Fitch’s   pal   among   them.   He   was   next   in   the trench   to   poor   Cyril   awaiting   the   signal   to   ‘’go   over’’.   Their   last   words   were a    pledge    to    each    other    that    if    one    was    taken    and    the    other    left    the survivor   would   notify   the   relatives   to   the   best   of   his   ability.   The   survivor, poor   fellow,   had   been   too   badly   knocked   about   himself   to   immediately redeem   the   pledge,   but   he   did   so   the   very   next   day   after   seeing   Mr   Taylor, and   although   it   is   poor   consolation,   the   Doctor   and   Mrs   Dennis   Fitch   have all the details of the noble way their boy met his end. A   letter   from   Captain   Acton   Wall   speaks   in   high   terms   of   the   capabilities of   Lieut   H   G   Hill   (son   of   Boraston   Hill).   The   gallant   captain   and   Lieut   Hill have   had   some   strenuous   times   in   the   trenches   together.   We   are   all pleased   that   the   Lieutenant   is   making   good   progress   towards   recovery, and that his wounds are not very difficult of treatment. Bill   Pain   has   sent   me   one   of   his   characteristic   letters   from   France.   He   and Bert    Pritchard    have    been    receiving    quite    as    much    attention    from    the strafing   Huns   as   they   care   to   tolerate,   fortunately   without   mishap   so   far. He   says,   if   he   live   to   return,   we   shall   find   him   darting   for   cover   if   only   a bike tyre ‘’bursts’’ The   death   occurred   on   Sunday   of   Mr   Henry   Skinner   senior,   of   Drayton. The   deceased   gentleman   had   reached   an   advanced   age,   and   had   retired from business for some years. Miss   Agnes   Meredith   reports   the   receipt   of   three   hundred   and   thirty   two eggs for the wounded soldiers last month. November   11th   Miss   Phillips,   who   has   for   several   years,   been   assistant mistress     at     Hillpool     Council     School,     was     married     at     Bewdley     on Wednesday.   She   is   not   severing   her   connection   with   the   school,   but   her fellow   teachers   and   scholars   could   not   let   the   happy   event   pass   without some   mark   of   appreciation   of   the   bride   and   her   good   work.   They   have therefore   presented   her   with   a   very   pretty   silver   teapot,   which   we   all hope    will    often    provide    the    cup    that    cheers,    etc.,    when    her    soldier husband returns from the war. Mr   David   Mann   has   met   with   a   serious   accident.   Returning   from   Flyford Flavel   stock   sale   something   went   wrong   and   the   trap   was   overturned,   and Mr   Mann   was   considerably   damaged.   He   was   taken   to   a   cottage   in   an unconscious   condition.   After   recovering   consciousness   he   was   conveyed home, and is now receiving careful attention from Dr Dennis Fitch. November   18th   Over   two   hundred   subscribers   have   given   their   bit   to   Dr Dennis   Fitch’s   fund   for   soldier’   Christmas   parcels   and   the   total   amount subscribed   is   about   £40.   Anyone   who   has   neglected   to   secure   the   honour of   being   on   the   subscription   list,   may   by   favour   be   still   allowed   to   make amends this week. November    25th    The    annual    supper    in    connection    with    the    Drayton Bowling   Club   was   held   at   The   Robin   Hood   Inn   on   Thursday   16th   inst. There   were   about   twenty   present,   and   Mrs   Pardoe   had   prepared   a   very nice   repast.   The   Chairman   (   Mr   Page)   suggested   that   a   collection   be   made for the ‘Soldiers Parcel Fund’: with the result that 10s 6d was raised. On    Tuesday    the    funeral    of    Mr    Drinkwater    (the    Mearce)    took    place    at Harvington     Chapel     The     deceased     had     been     an     invalid     for     some considerable   time,   and   his   death   occasioned   no   surprise.   There   were   a considerable   number   of   relatives   and   friends   present   at   the   funeral   to pay a last tribute of respect to one who was deservedly popular.