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Made with Xara Chaddesley Corbett Worcestershire, U.K.
Welcome to this historic village set in the beautiful countryside of north Worcestershire

Early Background

The village of Chaddesley Corbett is an ancient settlement with a prehistoric buriel mound and traces of a Roman road. Originally known as Chaddesley the name is thought to mean "Ceadda's clearing in the wood" and is first mentioned in a Saxon Charter of 816 when the land was given to the Bishop of Worcester in return for hospitality to the King of Mercia and his men. It is mentioned in the Domesday Book as belonging to a Saxon Noblewoman - and had two priests,  several corn mills, a population as large as Kidderminster and two saltpans in Droitwich for it's own use. After the Norman Conquest the Manor of Chaddesley was owned by the Corbett family who added their name to it’s title.  Later, church lands passed to the Earldom of Warwick and, eventually, to the Throckmortons of Coughton Court.

Contemporary History

Chaddesley woods in Chaddesley Corbett became a Nature Reserve in 1973 through the generosity of Mr. John Cadbury. The reserve consists of 53 hectares of native oak woodland and 47 hectares of recent plantations of  young hardwoods and softwoods - which were added to show how wild life conservation can be intergrated with modern commercial management. A "Jubilee Walk" was introduced in 1977 to mark the 25th anniversary of the Queen's accession to the throne.  The walk is marked by yellow arrows - which indicate public rights of way - and by white arrows which indicate courtesy paths.   There are Voluntary Wardens for the woods and the area is managed by the Nature Conservancy Council. The Woods are a special feature of the area and attract many visitors all through the year. Car parking only by the roadside. Guard against thefts.

Life in Chaddesley Corbett 100 years ago

APRIL 1917

April   7th    At   the   Sunday   evening   service   the   Vicar   made   a special   reference   to   the   death   of   James   Craddock ,   killed in   action   on   March   4th.   At   the   close   the   organist   (Mr   A   E Millward   played   the   ‘Dead   March’   from   ‘Saul’,   while   the whole    congregation    remained    standing    in    respectful silence. Private   Fred   Laight    was   back   in   his   old   place   in   the choir,   and   it   was   a   great   pleasure   to   all   his   friends   to   find him so well recovered from his serious illness. In   response   to   the   suggestion   of   the   Chairman   of   the Parish   Council,   that   the   corn   harvest   could   be   preserved considerably      by      destroying      sparrows      at      once,      a committee   has   been   formed   to   organise   the   work.   An excellent   secretary   has   been   found   in   Mr   J   A   Sayers,   of the     Talbot     Hotel,     and     sufficient     money     is     already subscribed   to   enable   handsome   prizes   to   be   offered   for those   bringing   in   the   largest   quantity   of   sparrows’   heads and    eggs.    A    further    suggestion    to    include    foxes    was treated   as   a   sly   dig   at   one   of   the   committee,   but   I   cannot help   feeling   that   it   would   have   been   an   advantageous move   in   food   preservation.   Only   last   week   one   farmer near    the    woods    had    about    a    dozen    laying    pullets destroyed in one night by a marauding vixen. April   14th    Our   Belbroughton   neighbours   mourn   the   loss of   another   of   their   brave   lads,   James   Portman    killed   in action.   We,   however,   feel   his   loss   quite   as   acutely,   as   he was   born   and   reared   in   Chaddesley,   and   attended   our village      school.      His      brother      Francis,      is      in      the Worcestershire   Yeomanry,   in   Palestine   in   the   same   group as    Fred    Millard.    Recently    these    two    Yeomen’s    names appeared    in    a    casualty    list,    and    much    unnecessary sympathy   was   evoked.   They   had   both   been   kicked   in   a football match! April    21st    A    most    successful    concert    was    held    in    the school-room   in   aid   of   the   Kidderminster   Infirmary   Linen Guild.    The    room    was    crowded    with    an    enthusiastic audience,    whose    repeated    calls    for    encores    testified their   enjoyment   of   the   programme.   The   songs   by   Miss Fennell,   as   well   as   the   songs   in   character   and   banjo   solos by   Mr   Perks,   fairly   brought   the   house   down;   while   the Toy   Symphony   by   Mr   Chambers,   earned   the   success   it   so well   deserved.   A   smart   little   dialogue,   entitled   ‘’My   Lady Haughtington’’,    by    the    Misses    M    and    L    Meredith,    was amusing;   Jane   Jackson   acting   her   part   to   the   life.   The proceeds amounted to £7 14s. April     28th      Mr     Charles     Craddock      is     unfortunately suffering   from   the   results   of   an   accident,   which   occurred at   Messrs   Seagers’   timber   yard.   During   the   removal   of some   heavy   trees   Mr   Craddock   was   pinned   between   two tree    trunks    and    his    legs    badly    crushed.    Some    time elapsed    before    he    could    be    released,    as    additional horses    had    to    be    fetched    before    the    tree    could    be hauled   off   the   unfortunate   victim.   I   am   pleased   to   say that he is now making good progress. After    a    dreary    wait    of    six    weeks    for    news    Mrs Herbert   Wilkes    has   heard   again   from   her   husband,   who is   a   prisoner   of   war   in   Germany.   He   writes   hopefully,   is   in good     health,     and     receiving     better     treatment     than formerly.   Probably   Fritz   is   beginning   to   catch   a   glimpse of   the   Red   Light   and   alter   his   tactics   with   the   prisoners, in    the    hope    of    escaping    just    retribution    for    his    past misdeeds.
© webdesign @ chaddesley corbett
Chaddesley Corbett Worcestershire U.K.
Welcome to this historic village set in the beautiful countryside of north Worcestershire

Life in Chaddesley Corbett 100 years ago

APRIL 1917

April   7th    At   the   Sunday   evening   service   the   Vicar   made   a   special   reference to   the   death   of   James   Craddock ,   killed   in   action   on   March   4th.   At   the   close the   organist   (Mr   A   E   Millward   played   the   ‘Dead   March’   from   ‘Saul’,   while   the whole congregation remained standing in respectful silence. Private   Fred   Laight    was   back   in   his   old   place   in   the   choir,   and   it   was   a great   pleasure   to   all   his   friends   to   find   him   so   well   recovered   from   his serious illness. In   response   to   the   suggestion   of   the   Chairman   of   the   Parish   Council,   that the   corn   harvest   could   be   preserved   considerably   by   destroying   sparrows at   once,   a   committee   has   been   formed   to   organise   the   work.   An   excellent secretary    has    been    found    in    Mr    J    A    Sayers,    of    the    Talbot    Hotel,    and sufficient   money   is   already   subscribed   to   enable   handsome   prizes   to   be offered   for   those   bringing   in   the   largest   quantity   of   sparrows’   heads   and eggs.   A   further   suggestion   to   include   foxes   was   treated   as   a   sly   dig   at   one of   the   committee,   but   I   cannot   help   feeling   that   it   would   have   been   an advantageous   move   in   food   preservation.   Only   last   week   one   farmer   near the   woods   had   about   a   dozen   laying   pullets   destroyed   in   one   night   by   a marauding vixen. April   14th    Our   Belbroughton   neighbours   mourn   the   loss   of   another   of their   brave   lads,   James   Portman    killed   in   action.   We,   however,   feel   his   loss quite   as   acutely,   as   he   was   born   and   reared   in   Chaddesley,   and   attended our   village   school.   His   brother   Francis,   is   in   the   Worcestershire   Yeomanry, in    Palestine    in    the    same    group    as    Fred    Millard.    Recently    these    two Yeomen’s    names    appeared    in    a    casualty    list,    and    much    unnecessary sympathy was evoked. They had both been kicked in a football match! April   21st   A   most   successful   concert   was   held   in   the   school-room   in   aid   of the   Kidderminster   Infirmary   Linen   Guild.   The   room   was   crowded   with   an enthusiastic    audience,    whose    repeated    calls    for    encores    testified    their enjoyment   of   the   programme.   The   songs   by   Miss   Fennell,   as   well   as   the songs   in   character   and   banjo   solos   by   Mr   Perks,   fairly   brought   the   house down;   while   the   Toy   Symphony   by   Mr   Chambers,   earned   the   success   it   so well   deserved.   A   smart   little   dialogue,   entitled   ‘’My   Lady   Haughtington’’,   by the   Misses   M   and   L   Meredith,   was   amusing;   Jane   Jackson   acting   her   part   to the life. The proceeds amounted to £7 14s. April   28th    Mr   Charles   Craddock    is   unfortunately   suffering   from   the   results of   an   accident,   which   occurred   at   Messrs   Seagers’   timber   yard.   During   the removal   of   some   heavy   trees   Mr   Craddock   was   pinned   between   two   tree trunks   and   his   legs   badly   crushed.   Some   time   elapsed   before   he   could   be released,   as   additional   horses   had   to   be   fetched   before   the   tree   could   be hauled   off   the   unfortunate   victim.   I   am   pleased   to   say   that   he   is   now making good progress. After   a   dreary   wait   of   six   weeks   for   news   Mrs   Herbert   Wilkes    has heard   again   from   her   husband,   who   is   a   prisoner   of   war   in   Germany.   He writes   hopefully,   is   in   good   health,   and   receiving   better   treatment   than formerly.   Probably   Fritz   is   beginning   to   catch   a   glimpse   of   the   Red   Light and    alter    his    tactics    with    the    prisoners,    in    the    hope    of    escaping    just retribution for his past misdeeds.
Contemporary History A "Jubilee Walk" was introduced in 1977 to mark the 25th anniversary of the Queen's accession to the throne.  The walk is marked by yellow arrows - which indicate public rights of way - and by white arrows which indicate courtesy paths.   There are Voluntary Wardens for the woods and the area is managed by the Nature Conservancy Council. The Woods are a special feature of the area and attract many visitors all through the year. Car parking only by the roadside. Guard against thefts.