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Made with Xara Chaddesley Corbett Worcestershire, U.K.
Welcome to this historic village set in the beautiful countryside of north Worcestershire

Early Background

The village of Chaddesley Corbett is an ancient settlement with a prehistoric buriel mound and traces of a Roman road. Originally known as Chaddesley the name is thought to mean "Ceadda's clearing in the wood" and is first mentioned in a Saxon Charter of 816 when the land was given to the Bishop of Worcester in return for hospitality to the King of Mercia and his men. It is mentioned in the Domesday Book as belonging to a Saxon Noblewoman - and had two priests,  several corn mills, a population as large as Kidderminster and two saltpans in Droitwich for it's own use. After the Norman Conquest the Manor of Chaddesley was owned by the Corbett family who added their name to it’s title.  Later, church lands passed to the Earldom of Warwick and, eventually, to the Throckmortons of Coughton Court.

Contemporary History

Chaddesley woods in Chaddesley Corbett became a Nature Reserve in 1973 through the generosity of Mr. John Cadbury. The reserve consists of 53 hectares of native oak woodland and 47 hectares of recent plantations of  young hardwoods and softwoods - which were added to show how wild life conservation can be intergrated with modern commercial management. A "Jubilee Walk" was introduced in 1977 to mark the 25th anniversary of the Queen's accession to the throne.  The walk is marked by yellow arrows - which indicate public rights of way - and by white arrows which indicate courtesy paths.   There are Voluntary Wardens for the woods and the area is managed by the Nature Conservancy Council. The Woods are a special feature of the area and attract many visitors all through the year. Car parking only by the roadside. Guard against thefts.

Life in Chaddesley Corbett 100 years ago

February 1917

February   3rd    ‘’Old   Chaddesley’’,   who   recently   wrote   an   interesting letter   to   the   Shuttle,   has   found   me   an   awkward   task   to   discover   any   of his   old   associates.   When   Mr   Page,   of   Hill   Pool   was   a   very   little   boy,   he can   remember   ‘’Old   Chaddesley’s’’   employer   being   at   the   workshop,   at Dorhall,   but   cannot   bring   to   mind   ‘’Old   Chaddesley’’   himself.   Mr   Page relates   a   Mr   Potter   was   a   blacksmith   in   the   vicinity,   and   the   smith   was   a very   sporting   old   chap;   if   he   heard   the   sound   of   the   hounds   he   would run   a   mile   hammer   in   hand   and   bear-headed,   rather   than   miss   the   fun. The   old   carpenter   also   was   a   droll   character.   He   wore   spectacles   but   had an   absent-minded   habit   of   pushing   them   on   the   top   of   his   head   when conversing   with   a   caller   -   finally   to   forget   where   his   specs   had   gone,   and searching with anathemas in the shavings for the missing goggles. Eggs   for   the   Wounded   -   Miss   Agnes   Meredith   reports   a   welcome increase    of    gifts    for    January    -    two    hundred    and    eight-five    eggs. Whenever   you   are   inclined   to   eat   an   egg   follow   Punch’s   advice   and ‘’don’t.’’ Miss Meredith can put it to much better use. Walter   Pardoe    has   paid   us   a   flying   visit   before   hurrying   off   with   a naval   detachment.   He   has   made   wonderful   progress   since   he   joined   up, and   we   wish   him   continued   success.   His   uniform,   rather   an   uncommon one,    led    to    an    amusing    experience    for    him    at    New    Street    Station, Birmingham.   A   traveller   accosted   him   and   required   full   information regarding   departing   trains,   and   ‘’Uncle   Peter’’   had   to   exhibit   his   naval badge to convince the interrogator that he was not addressing a porter. Private George Scriven has been brought to a Birmingham hospital for treatment. This is fortunate as it will enable several of his friends to visit him. February 10th Notes from the Soldiers - Bill   Pain   is   well   and   hearty,   but   says   the   cold   out   in   France   is   intense. Will     Dickinson     is     in     Egypt     and     continually     comes     across     old acquaintances.   He   says   it   will   soon   be   warm   enough   in   the   day   time   to need but little clothing. L   Woodward   (Harvington)   has   joined   up   to   the   same   squadron   as   Fred Millward - they are stationed at a nice place on the sea coast. Captain   L   Bache    is   in   Egypt.   He   will   be   sure   of   a   rousing   welcome from the Chaddesley lads, with whom he was deservedly popular. Mrs    Hubert    Wilkes    received    a    brave    but    pitiful    letter    from    her husband,   who   is   a   prisoner   of   war   in   Germany.   He   assures   her   that   he does   not   receive   the   parcels   for   which   she   pays   a   considerable   sum weekly    to    some    agency,    and    requests    she    keeps    the    money    for    the benefit of herself and the children-adding bravely, ‘’I can stick it’’. The   Christmas   parcels   sent   by   Dr   Dennis   Fitch    to   the   boys   in   Egypt arrived   just   as   they   returned   from   their   last   tussle   with   the   Turks,   and were doubly welcome. When   the   local   history   of   these   hard   times   comes   to   be   written   our   girls of   Chaddesley   will   have   nothing   to   regret   as   regards   doing   their   bit. Their   faces   do   not   appear   in   the   picture   papers   as   they   have   no   time   for fancy   dressing   or   posing   -   as   their   work   is   real,   hard   and   dirty.   At   one farm   a   cow,   a   confirmed   kicker,   refused   to   be   milked   by   any   of   the   men, so   the   young   lady   decided   that   her   gentle   influence   might   succeed.   It seems   it   did   not,   and   when   there   was   a   terrible   commotion   and   ungodly noises   in   the   cow   house   the   reserve   forces   moved   up.   She   explains   that as   ‘’Music   has   Charms,   etc’’   she   had   started   the   musical   box   under   the cow’s   nose   feeling   assured   that   it   would   sooth   her.   Evidently   the   cow’s musical    education    was    incomplete    and    it    entailed    much    skill    and enterprise to salve the musical box. February   17th    .   At   the   invitation   of   Mr   Corbett   and   Miss   Seager,   the members    of    the    local    branch    of    the    Girl’s    Friendly    Society     were entertained    on    Tuesday    evening    at    Pleremore    House.    The    company included   the   Vicar,   Mrs   Applewhaite,   Mrs   Dennis   Fitch,   Miss   Fitch, Misses   Page,   Misses   Meredith   and   others.   There   was   a   bountiful   spread provided,   in   so   far   as   war   conditions   allowed.   Miss   Fitch   gave   several enjoyable   items   on   the   violin,   Mr   Carl   Seager   accompanying   on   the piano, and Miss Meredith delighted the company with her recitations. Mrs.    Lea    Nicholls    is    looking    after    the    interests    of    those    allotment holders   and   cottagers   with   large   gardens,   who   wish   to   purchase   small quantities of Scotch seed potatoes. Early application is necessary. February   24th    .   One   of   the   most   interesting   events   of   the   last   few   days in   the   village   has   been   the   War   Loan   subscription   list,   organised   by Mr.   J.A.   Sayers.   The   idea   is   a   copy   from   the   French   Premium   Bond System   -   a   system   that   has   been   widely   recommended   to   the   British Government,   but   has   always   been   scotched   by   Puritanical   feeling.   It appeals   to   patriotism   in   its   best   form,   and   at   the   same   time   adds   that sporting   flavour   so   dear   to   a   Britisher’s   heart.   Although   the   idea   was only   started   here   forty-eight   hours   before   the   close   of   the   applications for   the   War   Loan,   yet   it   resulted   in   £100   being   raised   for   the   country’s service.   Every   village   in   England   would   have   done   likewise   if   only   the lead had been given.
© webdesign @ chaddesley corbett
Chaddesley Corbett Worcestershire U.K.
Welcome to this historic village set in the beautiful countryside of north Worcestershire

Early Background

The village of Chaddesley Corbett is an ancient settlement with a prehistoric buriel mound and traces of a Roman road. Originally known as Chaddesley the name is thought to mean "Ceadda's clearing in the wood" and is first mentioned in a Saxon Charter of 816 when the land was given to the Bishop of Worcester in return for hospitality to the King of Mercia and his men. It is mentioned in the Domesday Book as belonging to a Saxon Noblewoman - and had two priests,  several corn mills, a population as large as Kidderminster and two saltpans in Droitwich for it's own use. After the Norman Conquest the Manor of Chaddesley was owned by the Corbett family who added their name to it’s title.  Later, church lands passed to the Earldom of Warwick and, eventually, to the Throckmortons of Coughton Court.

Contemporary History

Chaddesley woods in Chaddesley Corbett became a Nature Reserve in 1973 through the generosity of Mr. John Cadbury. The reserve consists of 53 hectares of native oak woodland and 47 hectares of recent plantations of  young hardwoods and softwoods - which were added to show how wild life conservation can be intergrated with modern commercial management. A "Jubilee Walk" was introduced in 1977 to mark the 25th anniversary of the Queen's accession to the throne.  The walk is marked by yellow arrows - which indicate public rights of way - and by white arrows which indicate courtesy paths.   There are Voluntary Wardens for the woods and the area is managed by the Nature Conservancy Council. The Woods are a special feature of the area and attract many visitors all through the year. Car parking only by the roadside. Guard against thefts.

Life in Chaddesley Corbett 100 years ago

February 1917

February 10th Notes from the Soldiers - Bill   Pain   is   well   and   hearty,   but   says   the   cold   out   in   France   is   intense. Will   Dickinson   is   in   Egypt   and   continually   comes   across   old   acquaintances. He   says   it   will   soon   be   warm   enough   in   the   day   time   to   need   but   little clothing. L   Woodward   (Harvington)   has   joined   up   to   the   same   squadron   as   Fred Millward     -     they     are     stationed     at     a     nice     place     on     the     sea     coast. Captain   L   Bache    is   in   Egypt.   He   will   be   sure   of   a   rousing   welcome   from   the Chaddesley lads, with whom he was deservedly popular. Mrs   Hubert   Wilkes   received   a   brave   but   pitiful   letter   from   her   husband,   who is   a   prisoner   of   war   in   Germany.   He   assures   her   that   he   does   not   receive   the parcels   for   which   she   pays   a   considerable   sum   weekly   to   some   agency,   and requests   she   keeps   the   money   for   the   benefit   of   herself   and   the   children- adding bravely, ‘’I can stick it’’. Walter   Pardoe    has   paid   us   a   flying   visit   before   hurrying   off   with   a   naval detachment.   He   has   made   wonderful   progress   since   he   joined   up,   and   we wish him continued success.