© webdesign - chaddesley-corbett
Made with Xara Chaddesley Corbett Worcestershire, U.K.
Welcome to this historic village set in the beautiful countryside of north Worcestershire

Early Background

The village of Chaddesley Corbett is an ancient settlement with a prehistoric buriel mound and traces of a Roman road. Originally known as Chaddesley the name is thought to mean "Ceadda's clearing in the wood" and is first mentioned in a Saxon Charter of 816 when the land was given to the Bishop of Worcester in return for hospitality to the King of Mercia and his men. It is mentioned in the Domesday Book as belonging to a Saxon Noblewoman - and had two priests,  several corn mills, a population as large as Kidderminster and two saltpans in Droitwich for it's own use. After the Norman Conquest the Manor of Chaddesley was owned by the Corbett family who added their name to it’s title.  Later, church lands passed to the Earldom of Warwick and, eventually, to the Throckmortons of Coughton Court.

Contemporary History

Chaddesley woods in Chaddesley Corbett became a Nature Reserve in 1973 through the generosity of Mr. John Cadbury. The reserve consists of 53 hectares of native oak woodland and 47 hectares of recent plantations of  young hardwoods and softwoods - which were added to show how wild life conservation can be intergrated with modern commercial management. A "Jubilee Walk" was introduced in 1977 to mark the 25th anniversary of the Queen's accession to the throne.  The walk is marked by yellow arrows - which indicate public rights of way - and by white arrows which indicate courtesy paths.   There are Voluntary Wardens for the woods and the area is managed by the Nature Conservancy Council. The Woods are a special feature of the area and attract many visitors all through the year. Car parking only by the roadside. Guard against thefts.

Life in Chaddesley Corbett 100 years ago

MAY 1917

May   5th    The   tragedy   of   the   war   continues   to   fall   heavily on    the    family    of    Dr    Dennis    Fitch.    He    has    lost    two nephews   during   the   last   few   weeks.   On   Saturday   the   sad news   came   through   that   Lieut.   Lewis   (Dick),   only   son   of the   Rev.   Edwin   Lewis,   of   Hampton   Lovett,   had   died   of   his wounds.   We   can   all   sympathise   with   the   doctor   and   his family   in   their   bereavement,   but   we   ancients   who   can remember   the   good   old   days   when   Mr   and   Mrs   Lewis lived   and   worked   amongst   us   here,   will   have   a   deeper sorrow   when   we   try   to   realise   the   grief   of   the   bereaved parents.    Only    those    who    know    the    intensity    of    their affection   for   all   their   children   can   fully   grasp   the   need   for consolation now. One   beneficial   effect   of   the   war   is   that   it   inculcates   in   us more    self-reliance    and    a    better    appreciation    of    the dignity   of   labour.   In   our   new   found   strength   of   purpose we   see   some   strange   changes   of   occupation.   During   the past   fortnight   I   have   personally   seen   here   a   lady   clerk chain   harrowing,   a   shop   assistant   (a   lady)   ploughing   with two   horses,   a   qualified   surgeon   and   an   artist   ploughing with   a   motor   plough,   the   schoolmaster   loading   coal,   a skilled    mechanic    washing    his    own    clothes,    the    Sexton preaching    on    the    sin    of    Sunday    gardening,    and    the organist   dispersing   fertilising   matter   (it   was   expressed   to me in a more abbreviated but less printable form) . May   12th    William   Yardley    (eldest   son   of   Mr   and   Mrs Yardley,    of    the    Gabbs    farm)    has    unfortunately    been wounded   in   the   recent   battles   in   France.   Full   particulars are   not   yet   to   hand,   but   we   all   hope   his   wounds   are   not serious.   He   deserves   good   luck,   for   he   was   one   of   the first    to    offer    his    services    to    his    country;    he    was    only seventeen   years   of   age   when   he   enlisted   and,   and   up   to the time of this mishap he has been lucky as he is plucky. May   19th    Fred   Cope    from   Drayton,   has   had   a   bad   attack f   pneumonia   while   out   in   France.   He   is   now   much   better, and has been removed to hospital at Cambridge. All   the   Chaddesley   lads   at   the   Gaza   (Palestine)   front   were safe   and   well   up   to   date,   April   25th.   They   had   been   in   a very   hot   battle   on   April   19th   and   mention   with   regret   the loss     of     some     of     their     Kidderminster     companions. Captain   Rupert   Bache    has   just   paid   them   a   visit,   which was   very   much   appreciated,   especially   as   he   could   give them some fairly recent news of the old village. A   telegram   received   in   Chaddesley   last   week   notified   that Lieut.    Cyril    Williams     has    been    wounded.    No    further particulars   are   yet   known.   The   many   friends   of   our   late Vicar   will   no   doubt   extend   their   sympathies   to   him   and Mrs Griffith Williams. May     26th      Mrs     Hemming,     widow     of     the     late     John       Hemming   died   on   Saturday,   and   was   laid   to   rest   in   the village   churchyard   on   Thursday.   The   deceased   was   the mother    of    a    large    family,    and    there    were    a    goodly number   of   relatives   and   friends   gathered   together   at   the funeral to pay the last tribute of respect to the departed. Mrs    Wilkes    has    received    a    further    letter    from    her husband    ( Bert    Wilkes ),    who    is    a    prisoner    of    war    in Germany.   He   writes   much   more   cheerfully,   and   says   that he   is   getting   on   better   than   formerly,   hopes   to   send   her his photograph shortly. An   enjoyable   bowling   match   was   held   on   the   Talbot   lawn on       Wednesday       evening,       between       teams       from Kidderminster    and    Chaddesley.    I    have    tried    hard    to discover   the   result   but   none   of   the   competitors   seem   to know !
© webdesign @ chaddesley corbett
Chaddesley Corbett Worcestershire U.K.
Welcome to this historic village set in the beautiful countryside of north Worcestershire

Life in Chaddesley Corbett 100 years ago

MAY 1917

May   5th    The   tragedy   of   the   war   continues   to   fall   heavily   on   the   family   of Dr   Dennis   Fitch.   He   has   lost   two   nephews   during   the   last   few   weeks.   On Saturday   the   sad   news   came   through   that   Lieut.   Lewis   (Dick),   only   son   of the   Rev.   Edwin   Lewis,   of   Hampton   Lovett,   had   died   of   his   wounds.   We   can all   sympathise   with   the   doctor   and   his   family   in   their   bereavement,   but   we ancients   who   can   remember   the   good   old   days   when   Mr   and   Mrs   Lewis lived   and   worked   amongst   us   here,   will   have   a   deeper   sorrow   when   we   try to   realise   the   grief   of   the   bereaved   parents.   Only   those   who   know   the intensity   of   their   affection   for   all   their   children   can   fully   grasp   the   need   for consolation now. One   beneficial   effect   of   the   war   is   that   it   inculcates   in   us   more   self-reliance and    a    better    appreciation    of    the    dignity    of    labour.    In    our    new    found strength   of   purpose   we   see   some   strange   changes   of   occupation.   During the   past   fortnight   I   have   personally   seen   here   a   lady   clerk   chain   harrowing, a   shop   assistant   (a   lady)   ploughing   with   two   horses,   a   qualified   surgeon and   an   artist   ploughing   with   a   motor   plough,   the   schoolmaster   loading coal,   a   skilled   mechanic   washing   his   own   clothes,   the   Sexton   preaching   on the   sin   of   Sunday   gardening,   and   the   organist   dispersing   fertilising   matter (it was expressed to me in a more abbreviated but less printable form) . May   12th    William   Yardley    (eldest   son   of   Mr   and   Mrs   Yardley,   of   the   Gabbs farm)   has   unfortunately   been   wounded   in   the   recent   battles   in   France.   Full particulars   are   not   yet   to   hand,   but   we   all   hope   his   wounds   are   not   serious. He   deserves   good   luck,   for   he   was   one   of   the   first   to   offer   his   services   to his   country;   he   was   only   seventeen   years   of   age   when   he   enlisted   and,   and up to the time of this mishap he has been lucky as he is plucky. May   19th    Fred   Cope    from   Drayton,   has   had   a   bad   attack   f   pneumonia while   out   in   France.   He   is   now   much   better,   and   has   been   removed   to hospital at Cambridge. All   the   Chaddesley   lads   at   the   Gaza   (Palestine)   front   were   safe   and   well   up to   date,   April   25th.   They   had   been   in   a   very   hot   battle   on   April   19th   and mention   with   regret   the   loss   of   some   of   their   Kidderminster   companions. Captain   Rupert   Bache    has   just   paid   them   a   visit,   which   was   very   much appreciated,   especially   as   he   could   give   them   some   fairly   recent   news   of the old village. A    telegram    received    in    Chaddesley    last    week    notified    that    Lieut.    Cyril Williams    has   been   wounded.   No   further   particulars   are   yet   known.   The many   friends   of   our   late   Vicar   will   no   doubt   extend   their   sympathies   to   him and Mrs Griffith Williams. May    26th     Mrs    Hemming,    widow    of    the    late    John        Hemming    died    on Saturday,   and   was   laid   to   rest   in   the   village   churchyard   on   Thursday.   The deceased    was    the    mother    of    a    large    family,    and    there    were    a    goodly number   of   relatives   and   friends   gathered   together   at   the   funeral   to   pay   the last tribute of respect to the departed. Mrs   Wilkes   has   received   a   further   letter   from   her   husband   ( Bert   Wilkes ), who   is   a   prisoner   of   war   in   Germany.   He   writes   much   more   cheerfully,   and says   that   he   is   getting   on   better   than   formerly,   hopes   to   send   her   his photograph shortly. An   enjoyable   bowling   match   was   held   on   the   Talbot   lawn   on   Wednesday evening,   between   teams   from   Kidderminster   and   Chaddesley.   I   have   tried hard to discover the result but none of the competitors seem to know !
Contemporary History A "Jubilee Walk" was introduced in 1977 to mark the 25th anniversary of the Queen's accession to the throne.  The walk is marked by yellow arrows - which indicate public rights of way - and by white arrows which indicate courtesy paths.   There are Voluntary Wardens for the woods and the area is managed by the Nature Conservancy Council. The Woods are a special feature of the area and attract many visitors all through the year. Car parking only by the roadside. Guard against thefts.