© webdesign - chaddesley-corbett
Made with Xara Chaddesley Corbett Worcestershire, U.K.
Welcome to this historic village set in the beautiful countryside of north Worcestershire

Early Background

The village of Chaddesley Corbett is an ancient settlement with a prehistoric buriel mound and traces of a Roman road. Originally known as Chaddesley the name is thought to mean "Ceadda's clearing in the wood" and is first mentioned in a Saxon Charter of 816 when the land was given to the Bishop of Worcester in return for hospitality to the King of Mercia and his men. It is mentioned in the Domesday Book as belonging to a Saxon Noblewoman - and had two priests,  several corn mills, a population as large as Kidderminster and two saltpans in Droitwich for it's own use. After the Norman Conquest the Manor of Chaddesley was owned by the Corbett family who added their name to it’s title.  Later, church lands passed to the Earldom of Warwick and, eventually, to the Throckmortons of Coughton Court.

Contemporary History

Chaddesley woods in Chaddesley Corbett became a Nature Reserve in 1973 through the generosity of Mr. John Cadbury. The reserve consists of 53 hectares of native oak woodland and 47 hectares of recent plantations of  young hardwoods and softwoods - which were added to show how wild life conservation can be intergrated with modern commercial management. A "Jubilee Walk" was introduced in 1977 to mark the 25th anniversary of the Queen's accession to the throne.  The walk is marked by yellow arrows - which indicate public rights of way - and by white arrows which indicate courtesy paths.   There are Voluntary Wardens for the woods and the area is managed by the Nature Conservancy Council. The Woods are a special feature of the area and attract many visitors all through the year. Car parking only by the roadside. Guard against thefts.

Life in Chaddesley Corbett 100 years ago

MARCH 1917

March 3rd

 

The  

advent  

of  

a  

few  

dry  

days  

has  

caused  

a  

rush  

of  

work  

on

the  

land,  

ploughing  

and  

cultivating  

are  

now  

proceeding  

with

feverish  

haste.  

The  

warmer  

days  

have  

been  

most  

welcome  

to

the  

cottagers,  

who  

have  

suffered  

much  

from  

  

the  

coal  

famine.

It  

was  

good  

news  

to  

hear  

that  

very  

few  

of  

the  

cottagers

complained  

of  

the  

frost-penetrating  

the  

potato  

berries  

in  

their

gardens.

Sergeant   Major   Pardoe    paid   a   short   visit   to   us   this   week. He   is   over   from   Salonika   on   sick   leave.   He   is   cheerful   as   ever, and thinks the sea voyage has been very beneficial to him. I   regret   to   hear   that   Harold   Pratt    is   in   hospital   in   Scotland. He   has   had   rather   a   bad   breakdown   in   health,   and   spent   a month   in   hospital,   “Somewhere   in   France,”   prior   to   being   sent back to Britain. March 10th During    the    past    week    Mr.    Ernest    Dixon     has    had    the misfortune   to   lose   by   death   a   valuable   horse.   Some   folk   have been   busily   adding   up   farmers’   receipts   recently,   but   if   they would   calculate   the   other   side   of   the   balance   sheet   it   would often give them cause furiously to think. Here’s   an   anecdote   which   is   founded   on   actual   fact,   and   may be   useful   to   some   of   the   Lenten   lecturers   who   are   short   of   an illustration   of   “Faith.”   Old   Mary   came   every   morning   to   sweep and   tidy   up   Dr.   Dan’s   surgery.   If   ever   by   chance   she   found   a pill     among     her     sweeping     she     always     swallowed     it immediately.   Her   explanation   was   “It’s   sure   to   be   good   for summat.” March 17th The   villagers   had   a   painful   shock   on   Saturday   afternoon   when it   became   known   that   Mr.   Noah   Wagstaff    was   dead.   He   had only   been   ill   for   a   week;   in   fact   many   of   the   neighbours   were unaware   that   he   was   unwell.   He   became   rapidly   worse   on Saturday   morning   and   the   end   came   before   even   his   nearest relatives   realised   his   serious   condition.   He   leaves   a   widow and   a   large   family   of   young   children.   There   is   no   doubt   that when   the   SHUTTLE   reaches   the   soldier   lads   abroad   there   will be   many   moist   eye   this   next   week,   for   Noah   was   a   great favourite   among   them.   He   was   the   pioneer   of   Chaddesley football,   and   the   mainstay   of   the   team   in   the   field   years   after most   of   those   of   his   own   age   had   retired.   In   later   years   he became   an   enthusiastic   member   of   the   bowling   clubs;   yet   he always   found   time   to   be   a   pattern   to   any   allotment   holder and      was      conspicuous      among      prize-winners      at      the Horticultural    Show.    The    funeral    took    place    on    Wednesday afternoon,   and   was   attended   by   many   relatives   and   friends, including    a    number    of    members    of    the    Ancient    Order    of Foresters.   Bro.   J.   W.   Penny   (at   the   conclusion   of   the   church Burial   service)   read   the   Foresters’   service   as   Mr.   Wagstaff   was a   well   known   member.   A   gentleman,   Chaddesley   born,   but long   removed   from   the   parish,   chides   me   for   the   absence   of bell-ringing   anecdotes   from   this   column.   In   his   day   there   was a   rich   fund   of   anecdote   attached   to   the   belfry.   He   recalls   the ringers   ‘“strike;”   and   the   gentleman   who   volunteered   to   raise a   new   band   of   ringers.   To   the   delight   of   the   old   band   and   the chagrin   of   the   voluntary   conductor,   the   said   instructor   had   an early    rise    in    the    world,    for    the    unfortunately    became entangled    in    the    rope    of    a    bell    that    was    well    up.    His mortification   was   increased   when   it   was   later   discovered   that some   artistic   imp   had   drawn   a   cartoon   on   the   belfry   wall caricaturing    the    incident.    My    informant    fixes    it    at    twenty years   ago,   but   I   must   correct   him   there—it   is   much   nearer forty   years.   It   was   about   twenty   years   ago,   that   a   mixed band   completed   a   peal   without   discovering   that   the   clapper was   out   of   one   bell   for   the   major   portion   of   the   time.   It   is dangerous   to   mention   this   in   one   quarter   of   Belbroughton; but   I   warrant   Mr.   James   shakes   his   sides   when   he   reads   this week’s SHUTTLE. How   many   people   realise   the   actual   amount   of   really   hard work    a    man    does    in    ploughing    only    one    acre    of    land. Assuming   the   plough   turns   over   a   nine-inch   furrow,   at   the very   lowest   estimate   the   man   walks   over   a   fatiguing   surface twelve   miles   per   acre.   Yet   some   of   our   working   farmers   have been   doing   nearly   two   acres   per   day,   and   tiring   out   two teams   of   horses   in   a   laudable   endeavour   to   get   the   land planted. Referring   again   to   the   sad   death   of   Mr.   Noah   Wagstaff,   my attention   has   been   drawn   to   another   point   in   which   his   death is   a   serious   loss   to   the   neighbourhood.   He   was   the   possessor of   many   old   fashioned   secrets   as   remedies   for   sick   horses   and was   in   great   demand   at   many   farms   when   animals   were   on the   sick   list.   It   is   most   probable   that   his   secrets   have   died with him, and, if so, it is a serious loss to the community. March    31st     The    death    took    place    on    Saturday    of    Mr. Edward   Millenchip ,   of   Cakebold,   who   for   many   years   had been   the   faithful   and   valued   servant   of   Mr.   Edward   Corbett,   JP of   Pleremore   House.   The   funeral   took   place   at   a   mid-day   on Thursday,    and    was    attended    by    the    widow,    brothers    and other   relatives,   Mr.   E.   Corbett,   Mr.   J.   Corbett   (Hartlebury), and Mr. T. Partridge (Handsworth). On   Monday   morning    for   quite   an   hour   an   aeroplane   was circling   around   the   village   and   performing   all   sorts   of   antics above   us.   There   was   plenty   of   excitement,   especially   among the   school   children,   but   they   were   easily   out-distanced   by   the nervous    clique    who    believed    the    wild    rumours    of    last Saturday.   One   lady   called   out   excitedly   “There’s   six   thousand of the ‘Henemy’ landed and hes arter ‘em, he’s arter ‘em.”
© webdesign @ chaddesley corbett
Chaddesley Corbett Worcestershire U.K.
Welcome to this historic village set in the beautiful countryside of north Worcestershire

Early Background

The village of Chaddesley Corbett is an ancient settlement with a prehistoric buriel mound and traces of a Roman road. Originally known as Chaddesley the name is thought to mean "Ceadda's clearing in the wood" and is first mentioned in a Saxon Charter of 816 when the land was given to the Bishop of Worcester in return for hospitality to the King of Mercia and his men. It is mentioned in the Domesday Book as belonging to a Saxon Noblewoman - and had two priests,  several corn mills, a population as large as Kidderminster and two saltpans in Droitwich for it's own use. After the Norman Conquest the Manor of Chaddesley was owned by the Corbett family who added their name to it’s title.  Later, church lands passed to the Earldom of Warwick and, eventually, to the Throckmortons of Coughton Court.

Contemporary History

Chaddesley woods in Chaddesley Corbett became a Nature Reserve in 1973 through the generosity of Mr. John Cadbury. The reserve consists of 53 hectares of native oak woodland and 47 hectares of recent plantations of  young hardwoods and softwoods - which were added to show how wild life conservation can be intergrated with modern commercial management. A "Jubilee Walk" was introduced in 1977 to mark the 25th anniversary of the Queen's accession to the throne.  The walk is marked by yellow arrows - which indicate public rights of way - and by white arrows which indicate courtesy paths.   There are Voluntary Wardens for the woods and the area is managed by the Nature Conservancy Council. The Woods are a special feature of the area and attract many visitors all through the year. Car parking only by the roadside. Guard against thefts.

Life in Chaddesley Corbett 100 years ago

MARCH 1917

March 3rd

 

The  

advent  

of  

a  

few  

dry  

days  

has  

caused  

a  

rush  

of  

work  

on  

the  

land,  

ploughing

and  

cultivating  

are  

now  

proceeding  

with  

feverish  

haste.  

The  

warmer  

days  

have

been  

most  

welcome  

to  

the  

cottagers,  

who  

have  

suffered  

much  

from  

  

the  

coal

famine.  

It  

was  

good  

news  

to  

hear  

that  

very  

few  

of  

the  

cottagers  

complained  

of

the frost-penetrating the potato berries in their gardens.

Sergeant   Major   Pardoe    paid   a   short   visit   to   us   this   week.   He   is   over   from Salonika   on   sick   leave.   He   is   cheerful   as   ever,   and   thinks   the   sea   voyage   has been very beneficial to him. I   regret   to   hear   that   Harold   Pratt    is   in   hospital   in   Scotland.   He   has   had   rather a   bad   breakdown   in   health,   and   spent   a   month   in   hospital,   “Somewhere   in France,” prior to being sent back to Britain. March 17th The   villagers   had   a   painful   shock   on   Saturday   afternoon   when   it   became   known that   Mr.   Noah   Wagstaff    was   dead.   He   had   only   been   ill   for   a   week;   in   fact many   of   the   neighbours   were   unaware   that   he   was   unwell.   He   became   rapidly worse   on   Saturday   morning   and   the   end   came   before   even   his   nearest   relatives realised   his   serious   condition.   He   leaves   a   widow   and   a   large   family   of   young children.   There   is   no   doubt   that   when   the   SHUTTLE   reaches   the   soldier   lads abroad   there   will   be   many   moist   eye   this   next   week,   for   Noah   was   a   great favourite   among   them.   He   was   the   pioneer   of   Chaddesley   football,   and   the mainstay   of   the   team   in   the   field   years   after   most   of   those   of   his   own   age   had retired.   In   later   years   he   became   an   enthusiastic   member   of   the   bowling   clubs; yet   he   always   found   time   to   be   a   pattern   to   any   allotment   holder   and   was conspicuous among prize-winners at the Horticultural Show. March   31st    The   death   took   place   on   Saturday   of   Mr.   Edward   Millenchip ,   of Cakebold,   who   for   many   years   had   been   the   faithful   and   valued   servant   of   Mr. Edward   Corbett,   JP   of   Pleremore   House.    The   funeral   took   place   at   a   mid- day   on   Thursday,   and   was   attended   by   the   widow,   brothers   and   other   relatives, Mr. J. Corbett  (Hartlebury), and Mr. T. Partridge  (Handsworth).