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Made with Xara Chaddesley Corbett Worcestershire, U.K.
Welcome to this historic village set in the beautiful countryside of north Worcestershire

Early Background

The village of Chaddesley Corbett is an ancient settlement with a prehistoric buriel mound and traces of a Roman road. Originally known as Chaddesley the name is thought to mean "Ceadda's clearing in the wood" and is first mentioned in a Saxon Charter of 816 when the land was given to the Bishop of Worcester in return for hospitality to the King of Mercia and his men. It is mentioned in the Domesday Book as belonging to a Saxon Noblewoman - and had two priests,  several corn mills, a population as large as Kidderminster and two saltpans in Droitwich for it's own use. After the Norman Conquest the Manor of Chaddesley was owned by the Corbett family who added their name to it’s title.  Later, church lands passed to the Earldom of Warwick and, eventually, to the Throckmortons of Coughton Court.

Contemporary History

Chaddesley woods in Chaddesley Corbett became a Nature Reserve in 1973 through the generosity of Mr. John Cadbury. The reserve consists of 53 hectares of native oak woodland and 47 hectares of recent plantations of  young hardwoods and softwoods - which were added to show how wild life conservation can be intergrated with modern commercial management. A "Jubilee Walk" was introduced in 1977 to mark the 25th anniversary of the Queen's accession to the throne.  The walk is marked by yellow arrows - which indicate public rights of way - and by white arrows which indicate courtesy paths.   There are Voluntary Wardens for the woods and the area is managed by the Nature Conservancy Council. The Woods are a special feature of the area and attract many visitors all through the year. Car parking only by the roadside. Guard against thefts.

Life in Chaddesley Corbett 100 years ago

August 1916

On Wednesday night, while a heavy traction engine was proceeding up Larchford Hill and had nearly reached the top, the driving chain broke. Attached to the engine was a truck containing about seven tons of road stone. Both engine and truck ran backwards down the hill, gaining momentum every yard. The driver pluckily stuck to his wheel, and by almost superhuman effort and iron nerve steered the ponderous runaway till it reached the flat opposite the cricket field, where he brought it to a standstill on the roadside grass. A benign Providence arranged for the road to be absolutely clear of traffic when the accident happened, otherwise we might have had a far less  agreeable tale to tell. The engine belonged to Mr Everton (junior) from Droitwich: the driver’s name did not leak out, but he certainly deserves the highest commendation. August 26th: We are still fortunate in the news from our boys at the front. George Scriven is not so seriously hurt as was first expected. Wilf Perrins expects to get a home leave this week. Fred Millward and Bert Morris have tumbled across Bill Raybould out in Egypt, and compared notes: while ‘’Bungay’’ Leonard bemoans from Alexandria that he cannot find either of the boys, and don’t believe they are in Pharaoh's land at all. Cyril Fitch is having his baptism of fire somewhere in France. Good luck to him - may he do as well as Uncle Ben Willis. That intrepid airman, Dennis Pearce, has just accounted for his second German aeroplane, pilot and all. He himself, within the last few months, has been shot down four or five times, and has escaped miraculously each time. You will probably remember him as a quiet boy among the Combine who inhabited ‘’Liberty Hall’’. What a change among them now - from romping irresponsibles to serious soldiers facing death daily. I regret to say that the one who rejoiced in the sobriquet of ’Fish’’ has been “gassed’’.
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Chaddesley Corbett Worcestershire U.K.
Welcome to this “historic” village set in the beautiful countryside of north Worcestershire

‘The Boys on the Board'

“Chaddesley Corbett -  The Impact of World War One on a Worcestershire Parish” On behalf of the History Society, Sylvia Beardshaw has written this new book. Over 200 men with a Chaddesley connection who fought in WW1 have been identified. The book is about them and the impact of this war on life in Chaddesley Corbett. It contains 60 pages and is illustrated with many photographs both old and new, newspaper cuttings, map and tables. In Chaddesley it is for sale in the Village Butcher, the Flower Room and the Post Office, or contact_ Rob Blakeway 01562 777679 robandjoyblakeway@gmail.com  or Sylvia Beardshaw 01562 777955 rhbsb@ukgateway.net  Price £5.  A donation will be made to The Royal British Legion for each copy sold.

Early Background

The village of Chaddesley Corbett is an ancient settlement with a prehistoric buriel mound and traces of a Roman road. Originally known as Chaddesley the name is thought to mean "Ceadda's clearing in the wood" and is first mentioned in a Saxon Charter of 816 when the land was given to the Bishop of Worcester in return for hospitality to the King of Mercia and his men. It is mentioned in the Domesday Book as belonging to a Saxon Noblewoman - and had two priests,  several corn mills, a population as large as Kidderminster and two saltpans in Droitwich for it's own use. After the Norman Conquest the Manor of Chaddesley was owned by the Corbett family who added their name to it’s title.  Later, church lands passed to the Earldom of Warwick and, eventually, to the Throckmortons of Coughton Court.

Contemporary History

Chaddesley woods in Chaddesley Corbett became a Nature Reserve in 1973 through the generosity of Mr. John Cadbury. The reserve consists of 53 hectares of native oak woodland and 47 hectares of recent plantations of  young hardwoods and softwoods - which were added to show how wild life conservation can be intergrated with modern commercial management. A "Jubilee Walk" was introduced in 1977 to mark the 25th anniversary of the Queen's accession to the throne.  The walk is marked by yellow arrows - which indicate public rights of way - and by white arrows which indicate courtesy paths.   There are Voluntary Wardens for the woods and the area is managed by the Nature Conservancy Council. The Woods are a special feature of the area and attract many visitors all through the year. Car parking only by the roadside. Guard against thefts.